Where To Go

If you want to get or renew your driver licence, you'll need to apply in person at a Land Transport New Zealand driver licensing agent.

Driver licensing agents are participating offices of:

 

  • Vehicle Testing New Zealand (VTNZ) - selected VTNZ stations
  • Vehicle Inspection New Zealand (VINZ) - Auckland, Lower Hutt, Christchurch & Dunedin only

 What to take to the driver licensing agent

Application form

Take your completed application form. (Forms are available from driver licensing agents.)

Identification

Take one of the following forms of personal identification (these must be original documents):

  • A New Zealand driver licence that is current or has expired within the last two years
  • A New Zealand or overseas passport that is current or has expired within the last two years
  • A full birth certificate issued in NZ, the Cook Islands, Niue or Tokelau. (Note: older-style birth certificates that do not include your parents' details are no longer accepted by government agencies (including Land Transport NZ) as evidence of identity.)
  • A New Zealand photo firearms licence that is current or has expired within the last two years
  • One of the following certificates issued under the Citizenship Act 1977:
    • Certificate of NZ Citizenship
    • Certificate confirming NZ Citizenship
    • Certificate confirming registration of NZ Citizenship by descent
  • A certificate of identity issued under the Passports Act 1992 that is current.
  • A refugee travel document issued by or on behalf of the NZ Government that is current.
  • A certificate of identity issued under the Immigration Act 1987 that is current.
  • A NZ Police or NZ Defence Force photo-identity card issued to non-civilian staff that is current or has expired within the last two years.

Evidence of your address

Take one of the following forms of identification as evidence of your postal or residential address:

  • An account statement from your bank, building society, credit union or credit card company, issued within the last 12 months, which has your name and address on it
  • A telephone, gas, or electricity account, issued within the last six months, which has your name and address on it
  • Other evidence of address issued within the last 12 months - for example:
    • If you're still at school or are attending a tertiary institution, a school report or records certified by a teacher or lecturer will be accepted
    • If you have no fixed abode, proof of mail being sent to a post office for collection is sufficient.

Confirmation of change of name

If the name you want on your driver licence is different from the name on your identification or the evidence of your address, you'll need to take one of the following:

  • Your marriage certificate
  • A Dissolution of marriage order that says that the dissolution is 'decree absolute' (ie, final)
  • An original document from Births, Deaths and Marriages confirming that your name has been legally changed
  • A change of name by statuatory declaration, or deed poll of change of name, issued by Births, Deaths and Marriages
  • Other suitable identification (eg, adoption papers).

Eyesight certificate or correcting lenses

Each time you apply for a new licence class or endorsement you must prove that your eyesight meets the required standard.

To do this you can take a certificate issued by a New Zealand-registered optometrist or medical practitioner stating that your eyesight is satisfactory or that you may drive safely when using glasses or contact lenses. This certificate must not be more than 60 days old.

Alternatively, you can pass an eyesight screening check at a driver licensing agent. However, if you do not pass this screening check then you must provide an eyesight certificate before your application can proceed. If you're going to be tested by the licensing agent, remember to take your glasses or contact lenses, if you wear them for driving.

If you have sight in only one eye, or have only one eye (monocular vision) you must present an eyesight certificate from a doctor or optometrist.

Medical certificate

You must produce a medical certificate, completed by your medical practitioner, if:

  • you're turning 75, 80 or an even-numbered age older than 80
  • you have, or have had in the last five years, a medical condition that could adversely affect your ability to drive. The types of medical condition that may require a medical certificate include:
    • diabetes
    • visual disturbances (eg, diplopia (double vision) or cataracts)
    • Alzheimers
    • seizures, fits, convulsions, epilepsy
    • serious injuries (eg, head or spinal injuries)
    • high blood pressure
    • amputations
    • mental illness or nervous disorders
    • locomotive joint or limb problems
    • stroke
    • cerebral vascular accidents/disease
    • cognitive impairment
    • any other condition that may affect your ability to drive safely
  • you're renewing a Class 2, 3, 4 or 5 licence and have not presented a medical certificate in the last five years
  • you're renewing a P, V, I or O endorsement and have not presented a medical certificate in the last five years
  • you're requested to do so by Land Transport New Zealand.

Note: If you're a driver renewing a commercial licence, you need to provide a medical certificate when you renew your licence class(es). (A medical certificate may not be required, however, if one has been supplied to Land Transport New Zealand within the past five years and any medical condition you may have has not worsened, or any new condition been diagnosed.) The requirement to provide a medical certificate when you renew a commercial licence is a road safety measure that recognises the accident risks associated with driving for extended periods and/or driving heavy vehicles. It also recognises that the public have a right to expect that drivers to whom they entrust their safety (eg, taxi drivers) are proven medically fit.

Means of payment

Make sure you take:

  • a means of paying the appropriate fee - cheque, cash or EFTPOS card. (Some agents accept credit cards.)
    Note: If you pay by cheque, your driver licence will be delayed while your cheque is cleared

Driver licence classes

To drive a car you will need to get a Class 1 licence, but there are actually six classes of licence in New Zealand. Each class covers different types and weights of vehicle. That's because the skills you need to drive a car are different from the skills you need to drive a heavy vehicle or motorcycle.

You can apply for a Class 6 (motorcycle) licence or a Class 1 (car) licence without holding any other class of licence. But if you want a class 2, 3, 4 or 5 licence, you will need to get a full Class 1 licence first.

Class 1 – Car

A holder of a Class 1 learner or restricted licence can drive:

a vehicle that has a gross laden weight (GLW) or gross combined weight (GCW) of not more than 4500kg (this includes tractors and combination vehicles, but does not include motorcycles)

a moped or all-terrain vehicle

a campervan or tradesperson's vehicle with a GLW of not more than 6000kg and an on-road weight not exceeding 4500kg.
Note: a tradeperson's vehicle means a motor vehicle that has a body designed or adapted for use principally by tradepersons to carry special-purpose trade equipment or trade goods, excluding general freight.

The holder of a full Class 1 licence can driver

a vehicle that has a gross laden weight (GLW) or gross combined weight (GCW) of not more than 6000kg (this includes tractors and combination vehicles, but does not include motorcycles)

a moped or all-terrain vehicle

a forklift* with a GLW of not more than 18,000kg

a special-type vehicle* that runs on rollers or self-laying tracks and has a GLW of not more than 18,000kg

a special-type vehicle that runs on wheels and has a GLW of not more than 6000kg

a special-type vehicle that runs on wheels and has a GLW of more than 6000kg but not more than 18,000kg, if driven at a speed not exceeding 30km/h (if you want to drive at more than 30km/h you'll need a Class 2 licence)

a tractor with a GLW of more than 6000kg but not more than 18,000,kg if driven at a speed not exceeding 30km/h

a tractor/trailer combination of more than 6000kg but not more than 25,000kg, if being used in agricultural or land management operations and driven at a speed not exceeding 30km/h.

Class 2 – Medium rigid vehicle

A holder of a Class 2 learner or full licence can drive:

a rigid vehicle (including any tractor) with a GLW of more than 6000kg but not more than 18,000kg

a combination vehicle (that is not a tractor/trailer combination) with a GCW of not more than 12,000kg

a combination vehicle (that is not a tractor) consisting of a rigid vehicle with a GLW of 18,000kg or less towing a light trailer (GLW of 3500kg or less)

a rigid vehicle with a GLW of more than 18,000kg that has no more than two axles

a vehicle covered in Class 1.

In addition, a holder of a full Class 2 licence can drive:

a forklift* with a GLW of more than 18,000kg

a special-type vehicle* that runs on rollers or self-laying tracks and has a GLW of more than 18,000kg

a special-type vehicle* that runs on wheels and has a GLW of more than 6000kg but not more than 18,000kg (if you're always going to be operating this type of vehicle at a speed not exceeding 30km/h, you can use a full Class 1 licence)

a special-type vehicle* that runs on wheels and has a GLW of more than 18,000kg, if driven at a speed not exceeding 30km/h (if you want to drive at more than 30km/h, you'll need a Class 4 licence)

a tractor with a GLW of more than 6000kg but not more than 18,000kg, if driven at a speed over 30km/h.

Class 3 – Medium combination vehicle

A holder of a Class 3 learner or full licence can drive:

a combination vehicle (other than the tractor/trailer combination mentioned in Class 1) with a GCW of more than 12,000kg but less than 25,001kg

a vehicle covered in classes 1 and 2.

Class 4 – Heavy rigid vehicle

A holder of a Class 4 learner or full licence can drive:

a rigid vehicle (including any tractor) with a GLW of more than 18,000kg

a combination vehicle consisting of a rigid vehicle with a GLW of more than 18,000kg towing a light trailer (GLW of 3500kg or less)

vehicles covered in classes 1 and 2, but not Class 3.

In addition, a holder of a full Class 4 licence can drive:

a special-type* vehicle that runs on wheels and has a GLW of more than 18,000kg (if you're always going to be operating this type of vehicle at a speed not exceeding 30km/h, you can use a Class 2 licence).

Class 5 – Heavy combination vehicle

A holder of a Class 5 learner or full licence can drive:

a combination vehicle with a GCW of more than 25,000kg

vehicles covered in classes 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Class 6 – Motorcycle

A holder of a Class 6 learner, restricted or full licence can ride:

a motorcycle

a moped or all-terrain vehicle.

Notes* Certain kinds of vehicles require you to have a licence endorsement, as well as having the correct class of licence, before you can drive them. Some examples are special-type vehicles, passenger service vehicles and tow trucks. See the definitions for more information.

Holders of Class 2 and Class 4 licences are allowed to tow light trailers (GLW of 3500kg or less) behind rigid vehicles of those classes. Don't count the weight of the trailer in any GCW calculations.

An articulated special-type vehicle can be driven on a Class 2 or Class 4 licence, depending on its weight. This is because its handling characteristics are determined by it being a special-type vehicle, not because it's articulated.

If you're a tractor driver, you simply need to hold the right class of licence for the weight of the tractor. You don't need a W or any other special-type endorsement.

Licence endorsements

To safely drive some kinds of vehicles, or to provide certain kinds of services, you need to have special knowledge or training. A licence endorsement on your driver licence shows that you have completed whatever courses or qualifications you need for that endorsement.

The types of endorsement you can get on your New Zealand driver licence, and what they allow you to do, are shown in the table below.

Endorsement Allows you to
F Drive a forklift
P Drive a passenger service vehicle, eg a bus or taxi
V Drive a tow truck
D Drive a vehicle that is carrying dangerous goods
T Drive a special-type vehicle that runs on tracks
R Drive a special-type vehicle that runs on rollers
W Drive a special-type vehicle that runs on wheels
I Be a driving instructor
O Be a driver testing officer

 

 

Vehicle weight definitions

Gross weight means the weight of a rigid or combination vehicle, together with any load it is carrying (including equipment and accessories).

Gross laden weight (GLW) is the greatest of the following:

Gross combined weight (GCW) is the sum of the gross laden weights of the vehicles that make up a combination vehicle.

Tare weight means the weight of the vehicle without any load.

On-road weight means the total weight of the vehicle and load at any particular time.

Mass means the quantity of material contained in or on that vehicle which, when subjected to acceleration due to gravity, will exert downwards on a level surface a force that can be measured as the weight of the vehicle.

Gross vehicle mass (GVM) is the greater of:

 

  • any weight specified (following the latest modification, if applicable) as a vehicle's gross laden weight by the vehicle's manufacturer
  • any weight specified as the gross laden weight of a particular vehicle (or a vehicle of its kind) by the Director of Land Transport
  • the weight of a vehicle together with any load it is carrying, including any equipment and accessories.
  • the mass specified as the gross vehicle mass of a particular vehicle by the vehicle's manufacturer
  • the mass specified as the gross vehicle mass of a particular vehicle (or a vehicle of its kind) by the Director of Land Transport.

 

 To find out how to apply for endorsementsplease fill out form in our make a booking pageclick here

 

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Pass Rate

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Overseas conversion 100%
Restricted license 98%
Heavy vehicle 100%
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